Celiac Disease

Discussing the latest advances in celiac disease

January 30th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Celiac Disease Research

By Margaret Shepard

Are you interested in learning how the latest research might impact your care? Hear from Mayo Clinic doctors on how celiac disease research impacts patient care by watching the Celiac Disease YouTube playlist.

For more information about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiacdisease.

Tags: celiac disease, research

January 23rd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Gluten-Free Recipe: Grilled Chicken Salad with Olives and Oranges

By Margaret Shepard

Cooking gluten-free takes a little planning, but it's not as daunting as it might seem. This garlic-rubbed grilled chicken is a perfect complement to the tangy dressing on this salad.

Ingredients
For the dressing

1/2 cup red wine vinegar
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon finely chopped red onion
1 tablespoon finely chopped celery
Cracked black pepper, to taste
4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, each 4 ounces
2 garlic cloves
8 cups leaf lettuce, washed and dried
16 large ripe (black) olives
2 navel oranges, peeled and sliced
Directions
To make the dressing, in a small bowl combine the vinegar, garlic, olive oil, onion, celery and pepper. Stir to mix evenly. Cover and refrigerate until needed.

Prepare a hot fire in a charcoal grill or heat a gas grill or broiler. Away from the heat source, lightly coat the grill rack or broiler pan with cooking spray. Position the cooking rack 4 to 6 inches from the heat source.

Rub the chicken breasts with garlic, then discard the cloves. Grill or broil the chicken until browned and just cooked through, about 5 minutes each side. Transfer the chicken to a cutting board and let rest 5 minutes before slicing into strips.

Arrange 2 cups lettuce, 4 olives and 1/4 of the sliced oranges onto 4 plates. Top with 1/4 of the chicken strips and drizzle with dressing. Serve immediately.

For more information about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiacdisease.

Recipe originally posted on mayoclinic.org.

Tags: Gluten Free, gluten free recipe, healthy living

January 16th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Gluten-Free Diet and Traveling

By Margaret Shepard

Are you planning on taking a winter vacation? Joseph Murray, M.D., and Jacalyn See discuss tips to help people with celiac disease maintain a gluten-free diet while traveling.

For more information about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiacdisease.

Dr. Murray is a gastroenterologist and celiac disease expert at Mayo Clinic.

Jacalyn See is a clinical dietician at Mayo Clinic.

Tags: celiac disease, Gluten Free Diet, Jacalyn See, Joseph Murray, tips, traveling

January 9th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Managing Celiac Disease

By Margaret Shepard

1 out of 100 Americans has a condition called celiac disease, which is an intolerance to wheat, barley and rye. Its symptoms can be subtle, but if you don't stick to a gluten-free diet you could be damaging your body and not even know it. Learn more about managing celiac disease in this report from the Mayo Clinic News Network.

For more information about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiacdisease.

Tags: celiac disease, Gluten Free Diet

January 2nd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Healthy, Gluten-Free Recipes

By Margaret Shepard

shutterstock_168666851A gluten-free diet doesn't have to be short on taste or nutrition. Cooking gluten-free takes a little planning, but it's not as daunting as it might seem. Check out these healthy gluten-free recipes.

 

For more information on celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiacdisease.

Tags: Gluten Free, gluten free recipe, healthy living

December 23rd, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Gluten-Free Recipe: Fruited Rice Pudding

By Margaret Shepard

Looking for a dessert to pass at an upcoming holiday gathering? This fruited rice pudding can be made ahead of time, refrigerate and served cold or served warm, right from the oven.

Ingredients
2 cups water
1 cup long-grain rice
4 cups evaporated fat-free milk
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon lemon zest
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
6 egg whites
1/4 cup crushed pineapple
1/4 cup raisins
1/4 cup chopped apricots
Directions
In a medium saucepan, bring 2 cups of water to a boil. Add the rice and cook about 10 minutes. Pour into a colander and drain thoroughly.

In the same saucepan, add the evaporated milk and brown sugar. Cook until hot. Add the cooked rice, lemon zest and vanilla extract. Simmer over low heat until the mixture is thick and the rice is tender, about 30 minutes Remove from the heat and cool.

In a small bowl, whisk together the egg whites. Pour into the rice mixture. Add the pineapple, raisins and apricots. Stir until well blended.

Preheat the oven to 325 F. Lightly coat a baking dish with cooking spray.

Spoon the pudding and fruit mixture into the baking dish. Bake until the pudding is set, about 20 minutes. Serve warm or cold.

Recipe originally posted on mayoclinic.org.

Tags: Gluten Free, gluten free recipe, healthy living, Recipe

December 18th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

When to Introduce Gluten to Children

By Margaret Shepard

Imad Absah, M.D., discusses a recently published articles in the New England Journal of Medicine about when to introduce children to gluten.

The main take away of the study is that it most likely doesn't matter when gluten is introduced to a child. It might be reasonable in children with a high risk of celiac disease to check their genotype. Based on genotype and high risk assessment, it might be beneficial to delay gluten introduction to prevent any damage from happening. Breast feeding is still recommending for mothers who have celiac disease because of the benefits for both the infant and the mother.

Read the full article online here.

For more information about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiacdisease.

Dr. Absah is a pediatric gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic.

Tags: celiac disease, gluten, Imad Absah, New England Journal of Medicine, pediatric

December 12th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Is Gluten The Culprit In Nonresponsive Celiac Disease?

By Margaret Shepard

A gluten-free diet is the only effective treatment for celiac disease, and most adherent patients experience substantial clinical improvement within two weeks, with varying degrees of mucosal healing over time. But a small percentage of patients have malabsorptive symptoms (abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss) and histologic abnormalities that persist or recur, despite their best efforts to follow dietary recommendations.

When gluten isn't the issue, Dr. Murray says part of the evaluation should include a review of the original diagnosis — even if it means going back decades. "You have to have a very robust diagnosis. Some patients don't have adequate blood testing and some never had a biopsy because their gastroenterologist told them they didn't need it. Or there could have been an overcall on the biopsy; you have to review the pathology because something else may be damaging the small intestine, such as tropical sprue, which looks like celiac. There may also be drug-induced injury to the small intestine, collagenous sprue or, more rarely, autoimmune enteropathy. It can be very laborious to get the original data, but it may unmake the diagnosis."

Read more in the Digestive Diseases update.

To find out more about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiacdisease.

Tags: celiac disease, gluten, Joseph Murray, nonresponsive celiac disease

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