Celiac Disease

Discussing the latest advances in celiac disease

January 28th, 2016 · Leave a Comment

The Bacterial Connection to Celiac Disease

By kanaazpe kanaazpe

The increase in celiac disease incidence has led investigators to focus on whether environmental determinants, including gut microorganisms, contribute to the development of the disease. Dr. Joseph Murray discusses a new study which used a humanized mouse model of gluten sensitivity, and found that the gut microbiome can play an important role in the body’s response to gluten.

When an individual with celiac disease consumes gluten, the immune system responds by causing damage to the small intestine. This may lead to abdominal pain, diarrhea, bloating and fatigue, among other symptoms. In an attempt to address this, investigators from McMaster University in Canada, along with Dr. Murray, looked at how the immune responses to gluten varied with different populations of gut bacteria in mouse models of gluten intolerance.

Their findings are published in The American Journal of Pathology.

Read the full study online here.

For more information about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiac disease.

Dr. Murray is a gastroenterologist and celiac disease expert at Mayo Clinic.

Tags: American Journal of Pathology, celiac disease, gluten, gluten sensitivity, Joseph Murray, microbiome, small intestine

December 23rd, 2015 · 1 Comment

New Year. New Name. New Opportunities.

By kanaazpe kanaazpe

In their continuing pursuit for cure, the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness has announced¬†that the foundation has changed its name to Beyond Celiac. ‚ÄúFor the past decade, our primary goal was to increase awareness to ensure the undiagnosed could receive an accurate diagnosis and reclaim their lives and health,‚ÄĚ said Alice Bast, President and CEO of Beyond Celiac. ‚ÄúAs we listened to the community, it was clear their unmet needs extend far beyond raising awareness. By changing our name to Beyond Celiac, we‚Äôre emphasizing the evolution of our programs, services and mission to ensure that celiac disease is known as a serious, genetic autoimmune disease needing an early diagnosis and better treatment options.‚ÄĚ

The new name and brand, reflect the evolution of the organization from its early focus on awareness to its expanded role today in increasing the rate of diagnosis, improving care for the community and expanding research of new treatments, ultimately to find a cure for celiac disease by 2025.

For more information, please visit http://www.beyondceliac.org

 

Tags: Alice Bast, Beyond Celiac, celiac disease, cure, NFCA

December 16th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

The Pathways to Celiac Disease

By kanaazpe kanaazpe

What are the pathways that lead to celiac disease? Although celiac disease is characterized by damage to the small intestine, the actual process is quite complicated. In a recent paper published in Gastroenterology, Dr. Joseph Murray, M.D., examines the mechanism that leads to tissue destruction during the progression of celiac disease.

Read the full paper online here.

For more information about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiac disease.

Dr. Murray is a gastroenterologist and celiac disease expert at Mayo Clinic.

Tags: celiac disease, Gastroenterology, Joseph Murray

December 14th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

The Strange World of Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity

By kanaazpe kanaazpe

We’ve all met people who say they can’t eat gluten, but don’t have celiac disease. If you’ve been wondering whether non-celiac gluten sensitivity is real, you’re not alone. The term non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) has been used to describe individuals who cannot tolerate gluten and experience symptoms similar to those with celiac disease, but yet lack the same antibodies and intestinal damage as seen in celiac disease. We asked Dr. Joseph Murray, M.D., to further elaborate on an article published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, which features the latest clinical trial investigating the evolving phenomenon of non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

Read the full article online here.

For more information about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiac disease.

Dr. Murray is a gastroenterologist and celiac disease expert at Mayo Clinic.

Tags: celiac disease, Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Joseph Murray, non-celiac gluten sensitivity

December 4th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Isotretinoin Exposure and Risk of Celiac Disease

By kanaazpe kanaazpe

Isotretinoin is the standard treatment for certain types of acne. A recent study co-authored by Dr. Joseph Murray, M.D., and published in the journal PLOS One, concludes that there is no increased risk of celiac disease with the use of Isotretinoin.

Read the full paper online here.

For more information about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiac disease.

Dr. Murray is a gastroenterologist and celiac disease expert at Mayo Clinic.

Tags: acne, celiac disease, Isotretinoin, Joseph Murray, PLoS One

November 30th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Gluten in Makeup: Does it Matter?

By kanaazpe kanaazpe

Currently, the only treatment for celiac disease is lifelong adherence to a strict gluten-free diet. People living gluten-free must avoid foods with wheat, rye and barley. But many patients are questioning if there may be more to a gluten-free lifestyle than just making dietary changes. Gluten is sneaky; it may also be lurking in makeup and toiletries where it's used as a binder to help ingredients stick together, and to add moisture to products through gluten-derived oils. Tara M. Myles, registered  clinical dietitian at Mayo Clinic assures patients that there is no definite link between any gluten in beauty products and harmful effects for those who have celiac disease.

Typically, gluten must be ingested for it to cause a reaction. Unless you accidentally swallow them, gluten-containing skin care products and cosmetics aren't a problem. For this reason, avoid using such products on your lips or around your mouth, and also avoid gluten-containing dental products.

If you use a cosmetic or skin care product that contains gluten, and you develop a skin reaction, see your doctor or dermatologist to identify the cause. It is possible to have an allergy to wheat or another grain that causes a skin reaction. Since there's not any defined science on it yet, opting for gluten-free cosmetics is a very personal decision people need to make.

For more information about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiac disease.

Tags: celiac disease, cosmetics, gluten, makeup, Tara Myles

November 23rd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Was My Gluten Challenge Too Short?

By kanaazpe kanaazpe

How do we make the diagnosis of celiac disease in the patient who is already avoiding gluten? Dr. Joseph Murray, M.D., answers this question, and provides valuable insight into the often confounding topic of ‚Äėgluten challenge.‚Äô

Dr. Murray explains the science behind this trend, and empahsizes, "A gluten challenge needs to be done deliberately, and under medical supervision, ideally with follow-up tests already scheduled."

Join the discussion on Mayo Clinic Connect, a place to share your experiences with others living with celiac and find support from people like you.

For more information about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiac disease.

Dr. Murray is a gastroenterologist and celiac disease expert at Mayo Clinic.

Tags: celiac disease, diagnosis, Gluten Challenge, Gluten Free, Joseph Murray

November 21st, 2015 · Leave a Comment

FDA Proposes 'Gluten-Free' Labeling Requirements for Fermented, Hydrolyzed and Distilled Foods

By kanaazpe kanaazpe

New rules for gluten-free labeling have been¬†proposed for producers of fermented, distilled or hydrolyzed foods and beverages, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), announced this week. According to an FDA media release, this would apply to products such as¬†‚Äúyogurt, sauerkraut, pickles, cheese, green olives, vinegar, and FDA regulated beers.‚ÄĚ This follows the FDA's 2013 gluten-free final rule¬†which addressed concerns about the difficulty in interpreting results of¬†available gluten testing methods for fermented and hydrolyzed foods.

Once finalized, the proposed rule will require manufacturers to maintain records demonstrating that

  • Such foods meet gluten-free labeling requirements before fermentation or hydrolysis.
  • Their process has been adequately evaluated for potential gluten cross-contact.
  • That they have implemented prevention measures for gluten cross-contact during manufacturing.

The rule also states that gluten-free compliance for distilled foods, such as distilled vinegars, will be evaluated by the FDA by ‚Äúverifying the absence of protein (including gluten) using scientifically valid analytical methods.‚ÄĚ

The FDA is accepting public comments; to electronically submit comments to the docket, visit http://www.regulations.gov and type docket number ‚ÄúFDA-2014-N-1021‚ÄĚ in the search box.
To submit comments to the docket by mail, use the following address; be sure to include docket number ‚ÄúFDA-2014-N-1021‚ÄĚ on each page of your written comments:

Division of Dockets Management
HFA-305
Food and Drug Administration
5630 Fishers Lane, Room 1061
Rockville, MD 20852

For more information, click here

Tags: distilled foods, FDA, fermented foods, gluten-free labeling, hydrolyzed foods

November 12th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

10 Things Gastroenterologists Should Know About Celiac Disease

By kanaazpe kanaazpe

As celiac disease (CD) becomes increasingly common, healthcare providers need to stay current on the best ways to diagnose and manage this disease. In a paper published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Dr. Joseph Murray, M.D., along with Dr. Amy Oxentenko, M.D., reviews 10 important things that gastroenterologists need to know about celiac disease, based on current evidence and their experience in Mayo Clinic’s Celiac Disease Clinic.

The 10 items highlighted are:

  1. How to Use Serology to Diagnose Celiac Disease
  2. Can Celiac Disease Be Recognized Endoscopically?
  3. What Biopsies Should Be Taken to Evaluate for Celiac Disease?
  4. Which At-Risk Patients Should Be Tested for Celiac Disease?
  5. How Does One Evaluate for Celiac Disease in a Patient on a Gluten-Free Diet?
  6. How Is Celiac Disease Managed?
  7. What Should Be Assessed in the Patient With Newly Diagnosed Celiac Disease?
  8. How Are Adherence and Response to a Gluten-Free Diet Measured?
  9. What Is the Approach to the Nonresponsive Celiac Patient?
  10. What Do We Do With Refractory Celiac Disease?

Primed with this, physicians can better help in the education of their CD patients in conjunction with a dietitian.

Read the full paper online here.

For more information about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiac disease.

Dr. Murray is a gastroenterologist and celiac disease expert at Mayo Clinic.

 

Tags: Amy Oxentenko, celiac disease, Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, diagnosis, Gluten Free Diet, Joseph Murray, treatment

October 28th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

The Effect of a Gluten Free Diet on Liver Function Tests

By kanaazpe kanaazpe

Intestinal damage can be just the tip of the iceberg of gluten’s repercussions on a patient with celiac disease. The disease is also commonly associated with liver damage, and current medical guidelines recommend routine screening of liver function tests (LFTs) in patients diagnosed with celiac disease.

A team of researchers, including Dr. Joseph Murray, M.D., recently set out to accurately estimate rates of liver function test (LFT) abnormalities in celiac disease, and to assess the effect of a gluten-free diet on LFTs. The team found that just over forty percent of individuals showed elevated LFTs at celiac disease diagnosis, but the vast majority, nearly eighty percent of those patients showed normal LFTs within a year and a half of adopting a gluten-free diet.

In the study, published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology, Dr. Murray explains that strict adherence to a gluten-free diet can reduce LFT abnormalities within a year and patients with sustained LFT abnormalities despite a gluten-free diet should be evaluated for coexisting liver diseases.

Read the full study online here.

For more information about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiac disease.

Dr. Murray is a gastroenterologist and celiac disease expert at Mayo Clinic.

Tags: American Journal of Gastroenterology, celiac disease, Gluten Free Diet, Joseph Murray, liver function tests

October 28th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

A Review of Treatments Available for Celiac Disease

By kanaazpe kanaazpe

A gluten-free diet is central to the management of celiac disease, and has historically been the only treatment, although several potential therapies are now under development. In a paper published in Gastroenterology Reports, Dr. Joseph Murray, M.D., reviews the current landscape of new treatment approaches, and where these are in the development pipeline.

Read the full review online here.

For more information about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiac disease.

Dr. Murray is a gastroenterologist and celiac disease expert at Mayo Clinic.

Tags: celiac disease, Gastroenterology Reports, Gluten Free Diet, Joseph Murray, treatment

October 21st, 2015 · Leave a Comment

NFCA Webinar: Accelerating Celiac Disease Research

By kanaazpe kanaazpe

The National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA) Webinars are geared for those with celiac disease and other gluten-related disorders as well as the dietitians and providers who serve them.

Accelerating Celiac Disease Research: With You, We Can Go Further

Tuesday, October 27, 2015 from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. EST/10 a.m. to 11 a.m. PST

Join the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness for a special webinar to talk about the critical role patients play in research with three key leaders who are working to change the face of celiac disease:

  • Jacob Hughey, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, Institute for Computational Health Sciences, University of California, San Francisco and diagnosed with celiac disease in 2012
  • Francisco Leon, MD, PhD, Co-Founder, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Medical Officer, Celimmune
  • Joseph A. Murray, MD, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and NFCA Scientific/Medical Advisory Council member

Drs. Hughey, Leon and Murray will share examples of how patients have contributed to successful celiac disease research in the past and discuss how a motivated and educated patient community can continue to help to advance the field. Tune in to learn how patients, researchers and NFCA can work together to make a change.

For more information, and to register, please visit celiac central.org

To learn more about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiacdisease.

Tags: celiac disease, Francisco Leon, gluten, Jacob Hughey, Joseph Murray, NFCA, Webinars

October 19th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Is There a Link Between Celiac Disease and Heart Disease?

By kanaazpe kanaazpe

Celiac disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but the evidence base is limited.  Dr. Rekha Mankad, M.D., discusses the potential link, based on two recent studies, published in Digestive and Liver Disease, and Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases.

People with celiac disease have chronic inflammation in their gut because they can’t tolerate gluten; and since inflammation has been linked to heart disease, it is biologically plausible that celiac disease could be associated with the risk of heart disease, specifically atherosclerosis. However, further studies are needed to confirm this association, and to examine how the severity of celiac disease may play a role.

Read the full study (1)online here

Read the full study (2)online here

For more information about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiac disease.

Dr. Rekha Mankad  is a cardiologist at Mayo Clinic.

 

Tags: atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, celiac disease, Digestive and Liver Disease, Rekha Mankad

September 30th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Can Hypnotics Help Celiac Disease Patients Get a Good Night’s Sleep?

By kanaazpe kanaazpe

Many people with celiac disease suffer from fatigue ‚ÄĒ it's one of the most common symptoms.¬†Despite their fatigue, they report problems getting to sleep and staying asleep. Sleep disorders¬†seem to be very common before people are diagnosed with celiac disease, but may persist following diagnosis, once they start a gluten-free diet.¬†As a result, researchers are seeing a¬†rise in the¬†use¬†of prescription hypnotics to help patients sleep.

Based on the results of a recent study, published in BMC Gastroenterology, Joseph Murray, M.D., explains the  increasing use of prescription hypnotics such as benzodiazepines, melatonin receptor agonists, and other hypnotics among individuals with celiac disease as a proxy measure for poor sleep.

Read the full study online here.

For more information about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiac disease.

Dr. Murray is a gastroenterologist and celiac disease expert at Mayo Clinic.

 

 

 

Tags: benzodiazepines, BMC Gastroenterology, celiac disease, hypnotics, Joseph Murray, melatonin receptor agonists, sleep disorders

September 17th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Does Healing Occur After Diagnosis of Celiac Disease?

By kanaazpe kanaazpe

Joseph Murray, M.D., discusses an article published last year in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics. The study addresses the need for ongoing research to evaluate strategies which would promote healing and reduce persistent villous atrophy in patients diagnosed with celiac disease.

Learn more about the study online here

For more information about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiac disease.

Dr. Murray is a gastroenterologist and celiac disease expert at Mayo Clinic.

Tags: Alimentary Pharmacology Therapeutics, celiac disease, healing, Joseph Murray, villous atrophy

September 17th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Trends and Racial Differences in Celiac Disease

By kanaazpe kanaazpe

A recently published article in The American Journal of Gastroenterology explores the racial disparities in the prevalence of celiac disease, and a growing trend among people without celiac disease who avoid gluten.

Dr. Joseph Murray, M.D., explains the main take-aways of the article:

  • The prevalence of celiac disease¬†in the general US population of adults aged 50 years and older has increased significantly over the last 20 years.
  • The increase of celiac disease¬†prevalence mostly occurred in non-Hispanic whites, with the remaining low prevalence in non-Hispanic blacks or Hispanics over two decades
  • Recently, there has been a lot of attention on gluten free diet (GFD)¬†as being a healthy diet for relieving gastrointestinal symptoms in the absence of celiac disease.¬†The prevalence of GFD¬†without a diagnosis of celiac disease¬†in non-Hispanic blacks is highest compared with other racial groups, although non-Hispanic blacks have the lowest prevalence of celiac disease.¬†The reason for this is unclear, but may possibly be related to misinterpretations among racial groups about the definition of GFD.¬†

Read the full study online here.

For more information about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiac disease.

Dr. Murray is a gastroenterologist and celiac disease expert at Mayo Clinic.

 

 

 

Tags: American Journal of Gastroenterology, celiac disease, Gluten Free Diet, Joseph Murray

September 13th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Diagnosing Celiac Disease Not Always a One-Step Process

By kanaazpe kanaazpe

This article originally appeared on the Mayo Clinic News Network

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: My blood test for celiac disease came back negative, but I am still having symptoms. Is it possible that I still could have it? What should my next steps be?

ANSWER: The symptoms and presentation of celiac disease can vary quite a bit from one person to another. The most common symptoms are bloating and weight loss. Diarrhea or constipation may also affect some people. Less commonly, patients may experience an itchy, burning rash, called dermatitis herpetiformis, as well as heartburn, headaches, fatigue and joint pain, among others.¬†Celiac disease may also cause iron deficiency anemia and neuropathy ‚ÄĒ tingling or pain in the feet and hands that doesn‚Äôt go away.¬†Eventually, if left untreated, celiac disease may cause damage to the nervous system, bones, brain, liver and other organs.

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If you have celiac disease, eating gluten ‚ÄĒ a protein found in wheat, barley and rye ‚ÄĒ triggers an immune response in your small intestine that leads to inflammation. Over time, that inflammation damages the lining of the small intestine, making it difficult for the small intestine to absorb some nutrients.

Diagnosing celiac disease is not always a one-step process. It is possible that you could still have celiac disease, even if the results of an initial blood test are normal. Approximately 10 percent of people with negative blood tests have celiac disease. Additional testing can provide more information and give you and your doctor a better understanding of what may be causing your symptoms.

Diagnosing celiac disease typically begins with blood tests. It’s very important that the tests be done before you try a gluten-free diet. Taking gluten out of your diet before you have the blood tests may change the results so that they appear to be normal, even if you do have celiac disease.

The main blood test used for celiac disease checks for antibodies to an enzyme found in the lining of the intestine called tissue transglutaminase, or tTG. In about 3 percent of the population, however, the tTG test does not tell the whole story. That’s because when blood is drawn for the tTG test, levels of a substance called immunoglobulin A, or IgA, also are checked. If you have low or absent IgA, then the blood test is not reliable and other blood tests need to be done or an upper endoscopy may need to be performed.

An upper endoscopy is performed using gentle sedation. It involves inserting a long, flexible tube, called an endoscope, down your throat and into your esophagus. A tiny camera on the end of the endoscope allows your doctor to see your esophagus, stomach and the beginning of your small intestine.

During the endoscopy, your doctor may take several tissue samples ‚ÄĒ this is called a biopsy. Those samples are later examined under a microscope to see if they show any damage. In particular, damage to the tiny finger-like projections that line the small intestine, called villi, may be a sign of celiac disease.

If the endoscopy and biopsy don’t reveal any damage, then it’s possible your symptoms are being caused by another medical condition. For example, some people have gluten sensitivity that is not related to celiac disease. In others, symptoms similar to those caused by celiac disease may be triggered by intolerance to carbohydrates. Additional testing typically is needed to identify other possible underlying causes.

In a situation like yours, it can be useful to seek care from a physician who specializes in celiac disease to further investigate the cause of your symptoms. You also may find it helpful to work with a dietitian, whether you are diagnosed with celiac disease or not. He or she can assess your diet and identify changes that may help ease your symptoms. ‚ÄĒ Lucinda Harris, M.D., Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Ariz.

For more information about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiac disease

 

Tags: celiac disease, Gluten Free Diet, Lucinda Harris, Mayo Clinic News Network, upper endoscopy

September 11th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Is Larazotide Acetate the Answer to Leaky Gut?

By kanaazpe kanaazpe

One of the early consequences of celiac disease is that the gut becomes permeable, allowing access of gluten molecules into the immune system. Dr. Joseph Murray, M.D., talks about the investigational drug, Larazotide Acetate, that was developed in a clinical trial to reduce this leakiness or permeability. The study has been published in Gastroenterology.

Maintaining a 100% gluten-free diet can be quite challenging, especially considering that many people react severely to the cross contamination of even minute amounts of gluten. The study demonstrated that the lowest dose of Larazotide Acetate administered, not only reduced the symptoms of accidental ingestion of gluten, but patients experienced significantly less headaches, fatigue, and other gastrointestinal issues commonly associated with celiac disease. 

Larazotide Acetate has not been approved for use as yet, and will require further trials. It is important to keep in mind that this would not be a cure for celiac disease; rather, it would work in conjunction with a gluten-free diet. With this drug, celiac disease patients would not need to live in fear of accidental gluten exposure, as it would provide a necessary safety net to help them lead a more normal life.

Read the full study online here.

For more information about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiac disease.

Dr. Murray is a gastroenterologist and celiac disease expert at Mayo Clinic.

 

Tags: celiac disease, Gastroenterology, gluten, Joseph Murray, Larazotide Acetate, leaky gut

August 27th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Breast Feeding and Gluten Introduction: What Research Tells Us

By kanaazpe kanaazpe

For patients with celiac disease, conceiving, delivering, and nursing healthy babies are not insurmountable challenges. Past research has led to the hypothesis¬†that infant feeding practices and early or delayed introduction to gluten are key to the development of celiac disease.¬†However, two recent studies published in the¬†American Journal of Gastroenterology, co-authored by Joseph A. Murray, M.D., of Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., found that the¬†timing of gluten introduction ‚ÄĒ whether early or late in the first year of life ‚ÄĒ made no difference to the subsequent development of celiac disease.

While disappointing, these results should encourage the study of other risk factors such as intrauterine  exposures and environmental influences, including drug exposure and microbial infections. Given that celiac disease can develop at any age, it is imperative to study genetic background so as to develop future intervention strategies. With careful attention to diet, mother and baby can enjoy healthy lives.

Read the full study online here.

For more information about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiac disease.

Dr. Murray is a gastroenterologist and celiac disease expert at Mayo Clinic.

Tags: American Journal of Gastroenterology, breast feeding, celiac disease, gluten, Joseph Murray

August 15th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Can Enzymes Help Celiac Disease Patients from Gluten Exposure?

By kanaazpe kanaazpe

For patients with celiac disease, a gluten-free diet is the only treatment option currently. The diet requires total elimination of gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye, which when ingested can cause an autoimmune reaction, resulting in mucosal damage to the small intestine. Joseph Murray, M.D., a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic shares his expertise with the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA), and provides answers to questions on enzymes, and the current status of some celiac disease therapies.

As diligent as celiacs can be, avoiding gluten can be a challenge, and slip-ups can happen. There are numerous pills, enzymes, and other products being marketed to provide some protection against accidental gluten exposure for people with celiac disease. These treatments are not intended to replace a gluten-free diet, but claim to reduce the reaction to small amounts of unintentionally ingested gluten by breaking down the protein in gluten. While there's some evidence that this theory may eventually prove true, there's no evidence that the enzymes marketed over-the-counter right now have any special action against gluten. Dr. Murray emphasizes that, “It is vitally important that patients with celiac disease do not use any of these preparations that are being touted for reducing gluten. They have no proven benefit for patients with celiac disease." 

Fortunately however, researchers are studying a variety of¬†ways to identify and develop new treatment options. "People with celiac disease need to be patient as these can often take many years to put together all of the evidence to show they are both safe and effective.‚ÄĚ

Read the full interview here.

For more information about celiac disease, visit mayoclinic.org/celiac disease.

Dr. Murray is a gastroenterologist and celiac disease expert at Mayo Clinic.

 

Tags: celiac disease, enzyme, Gluten Free Diet, Joseph Murray, National Foundation for Celiac Awareness